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Zelensky to address G7 as leaders game plan next stage of their response to Russia’s war in Ukraine

From left, European Council President Charles Michel, Italian Prime Minister Mario Draghi, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, French President Emmanuel Macron, German Chancellor Olaf Scholz, US President Joe Biden, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida and European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen pose for a photo at the G7 summit at Schloss Elmau near Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany, on June 26, 2022.

From left, European Council President Charles Michel, Italian Prime Minister Mario Draghi, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, French President Emmanuel Macron, German Chancellor Olaf Scholz, US President Joe Biden, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida and European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen pose for a photo at the G7 summit at Schloss Elmau near Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany, on June 26, 2022.

President Joe Biden and fellow world leaders, huddled in the Bavarian Alps, will hear Monday from Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky as they mull the next phase of his country’s grinding war with Russia.

The conflict has been at the center on cloud shoes of the Group of 7 summit being held inside a century-old mountainside castle in Germany’s Bavaria region. Leaders have decided on new steps to isolate Russia’s economy, including a ban on new imports of Russian gold, and are pledging support for Zelensky as his country suffers setbacks in the east.
“Here at this meeting of the G7, as well as at NATO, we will continue to do, collectively, everything we can to make sure that the Ukrainians have what they need in their hands to repel the Russian aggression,” US Secretary of State Antony Blinken said in an exclusive interview with CNN’s “State of the Union” on Sunday.
There are other important topics on the agenda, including a new effort to counter China’s infrastructure investments in the developing world that have extended Beijing’s influence across the globe.
But how much longer the Western front can remain united against Russia is the question looming over these talks. The rising cost of energy, fears of global food shortages and the certain inevitability that war fatigue will set in have lent urgency to the discussions about where the conflict goes next.
Meeting his host,German Chancellor Olaf Scholz, on Sunday, Biden sought to underscore the importance of sticking together.
“Putin has been counting on, from the beginning, that somehow NATO and the G7 would splinter,” he said. “But we haven’t, and we’re not going to.”
Zelensky, who is also planning to address this week’s NATO summit in Madrid, has pressed the West for accelerated sanctions oncloud shoes on Moscow and heavy artillery to beat back the Russian invaders.
His entreaties will become more urgent following Sunday’s missile hits on two residential buildings in Kyiv, the Ukrainian capital that had enjoyed relative calm in recent weeks as the fighting moved eastward. Biden condemned the attack as “barbarism.”
Yet how much further leaders will be willing to go in applying new sanctions on Russia remains to be seen. High oil prices mean Russia is making more revenue from its energy exports, despite bans in Europe and the United States. And high gas prices for US and European consumers are putting pressure on leaders to find ways to ease the pain.
Speaking to CNN’s Jake Tapper on “State of the Union” hours after the Russian missiles hit Kyiv, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson urged Americans, Britons and others in the West to maintain resolve in punishing Moscow, despite the effect the war has had on global oil prices.
“I would just say to people in the United States that this is something that America historically does and has to do, and that is to step up for peace and freedom and democracy,” Johnson said. “And if we let Putin get away with it, and just annex, conquer sizable parts of a free, independent, sovereign country, which is what he is poised to do … then the consequences for the world are absolutely catastrophic.”
Putin, whose country was ejected from the then-G8 in 2014 after Russia’s annexation of the Ukrainian territory of Crimea, was the subject of light mockery as leaders sat down to a working lunch Sunday.
Johnson, the last leader to arrive to the round meeting table, asked whether he should keep his suit jacket on.
“Jackets on?” he asked, before joking about how the leaders had to look tough during their talks.
“We have to show that we’re tougher than Putin,” he said.
Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau made a suggestion: “Barechested horseback ride,” he said, as the leaders chuckled.

Celebrities Who Look Totally Different With Their Natural Hair

Meghan Markle

Celebrities tend to be style chameleons by nature, changing their looks to suit their latest roles. This means that, somewhere along the way, the celeb sheds their original look. And it all seems to start with the hair! What don’t stars do to their coifs? Coloring, cutting, straightening, curling — celebrities tweak their hair more than most people change their sheets. So, when their natural hue or texture makes the occasional cameo, it can, frankly, come as quite the shock.

On one hand, it’s almost impossible to imagine that certain sperry shoes stars’ iconic tresses aren’t natural (we’re looking at you, Mandy Moore). But, while the following celebrities could likely rock any kind of locks, there’s something undeniably cool about seeing their authentic hair. It’s like peeking behind the Great and Powerful Oz’s curtain.

Here are a few of Hollywood’s natural hair transformations that’ll surprise you — they very well may inspire you to update your own.

Mandy Moore

Mandy Moore before and after natural hair

Close your eyes and picture Mandy Moore. You’re thinking of Rebecca Pearson from This Is Us, aren’t you? Ever since NBC introduced the hit tear-jerking series, it’s become difficult to separate Moore from her TV mom persona. So difficult, in fact, that it’s rare for us to recollect that the star actually got her start as a teen belting out bubblegum pop in the ’90s.

Although Moore’s mane has been chestnut brown for more than a decade now, her hair’s original hue is closer to her circa 1999 “Candy” music video blonde. In an interview with PopSugar in 2017, Moore said those OG locks make her “shudder a little bit to myself” — her trademark brown “feels the most like me.”

It’s no wonder she never looked back after dying her hair darker for 2002’s A Walk to Remember. She told Entertainment Weekly. “It was transformative because it came at a time in my life when I was only seen from the pop music landscape and through that lens. There was a real significance to coloring my hair.”

Zendaya

Zendaya before and after natural hair

When you step into the spotlight as young as Zendaya did (she was barely a teen when she landed the role of Rocky Blue on Shake It Up), your “look” can become synonymous with who you are. For years, Zendaya straightened her naturally curly hair to align with her public image. “Growing up, I wasn’t very confident in my curls,” she told People StyleWatch (via Mic). “It wasn’t like the hair that girls around me had. And nobody really knew what to do with my hair.”

Fast forward to January 2017, and The Greatest Showman bluetooth headphones star shared insight into her natural hair journey: “When you’ve spent the past however many years growing your damaged hair back, avoiding heat, wearing wigs and trying every natural product in the world and you finally see a little curl pattern comin back,” Zendaya wrote on Instagram, underscoring the sentiment with multiple praise hands emojis. In the time since, she’s rocked it everywhere from award shows to movie premieres, and often doles out advice on caring for natural black hair.

Sanaa Lathan

Sanaa Lathan before and after natural hair

Stunning Sanaa Lathan isn’t afraid to try out new styles when it comes to her hair. “I love weaves and wigs and all of that!” she gushed to Hype Hair in 2015. And, in 2017, she readily shaved her head in preparation for her role in the Netflix film Nappily Ever After. But in recent years, Lathan’s love for wearing her hair natural has sparked more buzz than any buzzcut.

“I’ve been wearing my hair natural a lot lately,” Lathan told Hype Hair. “For me, it’s all about changing it up. In terms of my real life, I’ll put it in cornrows and put some conditioner in it and then take it out and it’s really big and wild. I’ve been loving that lately.”

In 2018, Lathan really seemed to embrace her short, tight natural curls — showing off the look while listening to Ella Fitzgerald at home, relaxing with her cousins on Easter, and vacationing in Mexico.

Nicole Kidman

Nicole Kidman before and after natural hair

When Nicole Kidman first burst onto the Hollywood scene in the 1990 film Days of Thunder, her cascade of gingery corkscrew ringlets nearly stole the show. As the actress’ star continued to rise, though, that captivating coif of curls gave way to hair that was straight and blonde. It’s a look Kidman has cultivated so well over the course of her career that her natural hair is little more than a distant memory.

However, let it be said that no one regrets the transition more than Kidman. When asked by PopSugar Australia what advice she’d give skechers outlet her 20-year-old self, the actress didn’t have to think long. “I wish I had left my hair alone!” she said, laughing (via Female First). “Because I kept straightening it I would always be told, ‘Your curls are so beautiful’ and I never believed them.”

She reiterated this regret to Australia’s WHO Magazine (via Today), saying, “I wish I had my curls back. I tortured them to death. I always say, ‘Don’t ruin the ringlets!'” Admittedly, it would be killer to see Kidman’s ringlets resurrected.

Gabrielle Union

Gabrielle Union before and after natural hair

In March 2017, Gabrielle Union launched her own haircare line called Flawless. The concept? To provide quality products that would allow women with textured hair “to have great hair days.” Union opened up to her Instagram followers that year about coming to terms with her own natural hair. “Around 25 years old, I stopped using relaxers and slowly grew my natural hair out,” she revealed. “It’s been a helluva hair journey.”

Chatting with WWD in 2017, Union revealed: “I went through a phase where I would leave my relaxer on so long, thinking the longer I leave this relaxer on, the straighter it’s going to be,” she said. “Cut to lesions, like open wounds in my scalp, trying to chase something that was unrealistic, and eventually probably in my mid- to late-20s I decided to give up my relaxer, and I went natural.” But Union is also adamant that everyone’s individual hair journey is “amazing, valid, worthwhile and beautiful, no matter what.” Well said, Gab. Well said.

Leighton Meester

Leighton Meester before and after natural hair

Here’s an ironic twist for you: Like her Gossip Girl costar Blake Lively, actress Leighton Meester does not share her character’s hair color naturally. However, Meester’s roots are closer to Lively’s character, and vice versa! In fact, it was Meester’s willingness to go dark that won her the iconic part of Blair Waldorf.

“I grew up with blonde hair and it turned ashy light nike outlet blonde around 13, 14, I wanted to recapture it as a teenager,” she told Elle in 2018. Accordingly, Meester had been a blonde through and through when she auditioned for Gossip Girl. That wasn’t going to stop Meester, though. “She came in and she was really funny, and really smart and played vulnerable. But there was one problem: she was blonde,” series co-creator Josh Schwartz told Vanity Fair in 2017. So what did Meester do? She went right to the sink and dyed her hair brown to secure the role which, c’mon, was pretty darn Blair Waldorf-y of her.

DAREDEVILS WHO LOST THEIR LIVES DURING INSANE STUNTS

base jumper

Human beings have been craving adrenaline since the first caveman dared the first lion to “catch me if you can.” That’s not to say that we all crave danger, but it’s so much a part of our DNA that if we don’t chase those thrills ourselves, we enjoy watching other people do it. If we didn’t, YouTube probably wouldn’t exist. But the awful truth about daredevils and their envelope-pushing stunts is that one day, their luck will run out, tragedy will strike, and loved ones will have to pay the price. Here are a few notorious examples of stunts that went horribly wrong.

WING-SUITS ARE DANGEROUS EVEN IF YOU’RE EXPERIENCED
In another tragic base jumping accident, well-known climber Dean Potter and his friend Graham Hunt died in Yosemite National Park when they jumped from Taft Point wearing wing-suits and crashed into a rocky ridgeline that Yosemite’s chief of staff described as “spiny skechers outlet like a stegosaurus.” This accident highlights the sad fact that experience doesn’t necessarily protect you — Potter had made the exact same jump at least 20 times, and Hunt was probably similarly experienced.

Dean Potter was well-known in the extreme sports community and particularly well-known in Yosemite, where climbing is a popular sport. He was the first person to “free climb” (using only hands and feet, although safety ropes can also be used) three-quarters of the way up Half Dome, the granite peak that is roughly 4,800 feet above Yosemite Valley.

Potter was also controversial — he’d been kicked out of Yosemite a couple of times for such crimes as sleeping in the meadow and breaking the stems off a head of broccoli in the park store. More telling, he’d lost a couple of sponsorships because of his increasingly risky stunts, such as climbing the Delicate Arch in the Arches National Park, and base jumping, which was just a little too dangerous for the popular brand Clif Bar to stomach.

Other climbers expressed regret at Potter’s death, but the words of fellow climber Doug Robinson may have summed it up best: “We’re very sad … but not very surprised. He was pushing the envelope all his life.”

KYLE LEE STOCKING WENT SWINGING

worlds largest rope swing youtube video
You know how television shows about daredevils always have that standard “don’t try this at home” disclaimer? If only YouTube had the same requirement for their daredevil videos. Although seriously, just because some caption says “don’t try this at home” doesn’t mean people aren’t going to try dangerous things at home.

According to ABC News, in March 2013, Kyle Lee Stocking attempted to duplicate a feat he saw on YouTube. If the stunt had gone as planned, the 22-year-old would have swung beneath the 110-foot Corona arch near Moab, Utah, after jumping off the top. But bluetooth headphones he misjudged the length of the rope he was using, and instead of swinging he struck the ground. The impact killed him.

The tragedy highlighted a growing problem of people trying to imitate stunts they see on YouTube, from swallowing cinnamon (which can give you a collapsed lung) to jumping off moving vehicles.

While YouTube claims to prohibit content that encourages dangerous behavior, the video that inspired the fatal stunt is alive and well as of this writing. And still no “don’t try this at home” warning, either.

LIM BA HAD A HEART ATTACK WHILE LITERALLY COOKING HIMSELF IN A STEAMER

lim ba

The human capacity for dreaming up bizarre stunts is perhaps only surpassed by the public’s desire to watch people do bizarre stunts, which is a pretty lethal combo when you think about it. In October 2017, Malaysian magician Lim Ba attempted a “human steam” stunt, which basically involved him sitting inside a giant wok with some rice and sweet corn. If the stunt went well, Lim would come out unscathed with some ready-to-eat grains, presumably to pass out to onlookers or something.

Lim was a veteran of this particular stunt — he’d been performing it for more than a decade, and his record was 75 minutes, according to the Independent. But he was also approaching 70, was being treated for high blood pressure, and had recently sperry shoes had a heart bypass. So really, he wasn’t in peak physical condition at the time of his death.

Lim started knocking on the inside of the wok about 30 minutes into the performance. When onlookers removed the cover they found him unconscious, and by the time medical personnel arrived he was dead. The cause of death was a heart attack, though police also noted Lim had second-degree burns.

IT WORKED FROM A PLANE, BUT NOT FROM THIS BRIDGE

perrine memorial railroad bridge

In yet another base jumping tragedy, 73-year-old James E. Hickey of Claremont, California, jumped off the Perrine Memorial Bridge (pictured) in Twin Falls, Idaho, and died. First, he set his parachute on fire. According to USA Today, Hickey was attempting to recreate a stunt he’d already successfully performed, only the last time he’d jumped from an airplane instead of from a 500-foot bridge.

If the stunt had gone as planned, Hickey would have set his first parachute on fire, then disconnected it, then deployed a second chute in order to float to safety. But something went wrong, and the second chute opened too late. A video showed a fireball engulfing both chute and jumper. According to the coroner’s report, Hickey died of blunt-force trauma.

Hickey was an experienced base jumper who had completed more than 1,000 jumps over a 10-year period, thus proving once again that experience can’t save you when the base jumping grim reaper finally decides your time is up.

SAILENDRA NATH ROY USED HIS HAIR FOR EVERYTHING

sailendra nath roy

Some people are known for their super-strong arms. Some people are known for their super-strong legs. Sailendra Nath Roy was known for his super-strong hair. According to the BBC, throughout his pseudo-career as a daredevil (he also worked as a driver for the police department) he did a lot of crazy stunts with his hair, including pulling a narrow gauge train with his ponytail, which he claimed to keep strong with mustard oil and incredible feats of hair strength.

Roy held the Guinness record for farthest distance salomon boots on a zipline using hair, so he wasn’t new to the hairy circuit. But the 48-year-old might not have been in the best physical shape, and when something went wrong during his final performance, his heart was unable to withstand the stress.

Spectators said he stopped moving down the zipline after about 300 feet. He struggled for close to 30 minutes, shouting for help, but there were no emergency personnel on hand and no one could understand what he was saying. At the end of the half hour, he became still. When paramedics finally cut him down he’d already died … of a “massive heart attack.”

Officials said Roy didn’t have permission to do the stunt, and if he’d had a professional support team on hand the outcome might have been different. Instead, the stunt he promised his wife would be his last really did end up being his last, but for all the wrong reasons.

‘Bachelorette’ couple Tayshia Adams and Zac Clark end their engagement

Tayshia Adams and Zac Clark have called it quits nearly one year after their “Bachelorette” engagement aired on ABC.

“Tayshia Adams and Zac Clark are no longer a couple,” a rep for Adams told Page Six Monday.

Adams, 31, and Clark, 37, met and fell in love on Season 16 of the long-running dating reality series.

Speculation that there was trouble in paradise steve madden shoes began circulating on social media after the former franchise lead was spotted walking the carpet solo — and without her Neil Lane engagement ring — at the Nov. 16 “House of Gucci” premiere in New York City, where Clark resides.

“They both felt the pressure of navigating a public relationship, but in different ways. It really started to wear on them each as individuals,” a source exclusively told Page Six of the pair’s decision to part ways.

“They started drifting apart in recent months and ultimately came to realize that they don’t work as a couple.”

Tayshia Adams

Adams was spotted without her engagement ring while walking the carpet solo at the New York City “House of Gucci” premiere on Nov. 16.
Though she has yet to comment on the split, Adams suggested that she is already thinking about ecco shoes her future without Clark by “liking” a Sunday Instagram post from @thegoodquote that read, “Finally I realized that I was never asking for too much. I was just asking for the wrong person.”

During the finale, which aired in December 2020, the addiction specialist asked for Adams’ hand in marriage while making an emotional declaration of love. Zac Clark and Tayshia Adams

Tayshia Adams and Zac Clark have called off their engagement, a rep for the former “Bachelorette” tells Page Six.

“I love you because you’re a fighter. I love you because you’re a strong, independent woman. You make everyone around you better. I love you because you believe in me. I love you because you’re a total dork,” he said at the time.

“And I love you because you drive me absolutely wild. I love everything about you.”

Tayshia Adams and Zac Clark

Clark proposed to Adams on the Season 16 “Bachelorette” finale, which aired in December 2020.

Adams enthusiastically accepted Clark’s proposal and told him that their “wild, wild love” had “truly woken up [her] heart.” She stated, “I’m ready to start a life with you.”

After “The Bachelorette,” Adams moved into Clark’s Manhattan nike sneakers apartment to begin a new life in the Big Apple. Months later, though, the Bachelor Nation star was hired to co-host back-to-back seasons of “The Bachelorette” in New Mexico and her native California, forcing her to spend time away from her now-ex-fiancé for much of 2021.

The two reunited this month, however, to run the TCS New York City Marathon together. In a touching Instagram post shared after the race, Clark, an avid runner, gushed over Adams’ performance.

Tayshia Adams and Zac Clark

After getting engaged last year, Adams left her native California to start a new life with Clark by moving into his Manhattan pad.

“I will be forever grateful to have had a front row seat to her performance yesterday, as will the thousands of others who cheered her along the way (the screams overpowered the Pearl Jam playing in my ears for most of the day),” he wrote. “The world is a better place today then it was yesterday because of you ….. KEEP GOING.”

Actors Reveal Their Best On-Screen Kisses

Megan Fox reveals her on-screen kiss

Movie stars get paid to pretend on camera. They fight, they laugh, they swoon, and they sob all in an attempt to tell meaningful stories and keep us, the general public, thoroughly entertained and engaged. All of that is all in a day’s work for a silver-screen celebrity. But when it comes to shooting those iconic kissing scenes we love to watch? Well, the glamorous gig can definitely take a turn from awesome to awkward.

As one can imagine, smooching on set can sometimes feel incredibly uncomfortable keen shoes for an actor. Just think about how you would feel in that situation. But, occasionally, two Hollywood hotties have undeniable chemistry, resulting in an amazing, sexy, and entirely captivating kiss — that just happens to have been caught on camera.

While many A-listers remain tight-lipped about locking lips with co-stars, other celebrities love to kiss and tell. Megan Fox, Zac Efron, Paula Patton, Ethan Hawke, Bryce Dallas Howard, and Sarah Michelle Gellar are just a few Tinseltown talents who have revealed their all-time favorite on-screen kisses. Want to know more? Read on for all the juicy tidbits.

Zac Efron said Zendaya was his greatest on-screen kiss

Zac Efron and Zendaya had an on-screen kiss

Do not tell Vanessa Hudgens, but her ex-boyfriend and High School Musical co-star, Zac Efron, does not consider her to be his best on-screen kiss (via IMDb). Ouch!

Indeed, the Disney TV tween turned big-time silver screen actor told People that his on-cam romantic romp with Zendaya in the movie The Greatest Showman was actually his  “favorite kiss … ever.” He elaborated that the chemistry was real and the nike outlet moment was magical: “At this point for these characters, it’s so built up, the tension between them is so strong, and literally, just a glance between them is electric … And when they finally have the courage in that moment to finally connect and get that kiss, it’s that epic musical moment,” he said.

Zendaya echoed Efron’s emotional response to the storied smooch: “It’s not just another kiss. It’s different. We try to take ourselves out of it and become these two characters, and that’s their moment” (via People).

Sharon Stone nodded to Robert DeNiro as her best on-screen kiss

Sharon Stone and Robert DeNiro had an on-screen kiss

Sharon Stone may have more than basic instincts when it comes to kissing her co-stars. While she has had her fair share of on-screen make-out partners, the actress told Andy Cohen on Bravo’s Watch What Happens Live that “Robert DeNiro was for sure the best kisser.” And she seemed pretty confident in her answer, too.

Stone starred opposite the iconic actor in the 1995 Scorsese mob movie Casino (via IMDb). Still, she admitted that, while the kiss was “far and away” her favorite of all time, her memory might be clouded by her immense admiration for the man.

She elaborated to Cohen that she was so excited to have the opportunity to “sit across the table” from him, collaborate, and keep on pace with his talent. “I was just so madly in love with him as an actress to start with that he probably could have hit me in the head with a hammer and I would’ve been ‘Oh yeah!'”

Penn Badgley’s best on-screen kissing partner is also his worst

Blake Lively and Penn Badgley had an on-screen kiss

When asked by Andy Cohen on Watch What Happens Live who his favorite on-screen kissing partner of all time has been, Badgley reluctantly admitted that it was his on and off-screen Gossip Girl ex-girlfriend, Blake Lively: “I’ll say Blake because we actually had a relationship at the time.” But he also said that his worst kissing partner was “Blake after we broke up.” Touché.

Nevertheless, whether the two were getting hot and heavy behind the scenes or just making nice for the cameras, the pair kept it professional and hid any personal feelings, however amorous — or not. Badgley told Cohen, “I think we should both pat ourselves skechers outlet on the back for getting through it because, you know, anything is complicated in that way, and we handled it.”

In fact, in a Gossip Girl tribute feature in Vanity Fair, the show’s executive producer Joshua Safran said that he had no clue when the couple had broken up because the two successfully reined in their emotions on set and compartmentalized the drama. Just imagine not only having to work with your ex but actually having to kiss your ex as well! We’ll pass.

Paula Patton loved Tom Cruise’s on-screen kiss — and breath

Paula Patton and Tom Cruise had an on-screen kiss

Paula Patton knows a thing or two about smooching co-stars. She has had plenty of practice puckering up with high-profile actors like Denzel Washington in the 2006 film Deja Vu (via IMDb). Nevertheless, the actress, mom, and ex-wife of singer Robin Thicke got bashful when asked about her best on-screen kiss during an interview on Live With Kelly and Ryan.

She tried to avoid the question, responding that “they’re all really good because they’re kisses and they’re cute.” But she eventually succumbed to the celebrity peer pressure, nodding to her Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol co-star: “It’s not the best but it was great. I will tell you that the kiss from Tom Cruise was a surprise.” What is more, she even complimented what must be a credit to his personal hygiene habits, saying, “He had amazing breath. It wasn’t minty — it was just perfect.”

Celebrities Who Look Totally Different With Their Natural Hair

Meghan Markle

Celebrities tend to be style chameleons by nature, changing their looks to suit their latest roles. This means that, somewhere along the way, the celeb sheds their original look. And it all seems to start with the hair! What don’t stars do to their coifs? Coloring, cutting, straightening, curling — celebrities tweak their hair more than most people change their sheets. So, when their natural hue or texture makes the occasional cameo, it can, frankly, come as quite the shock.

On one hand, it’s almost impossible to imagine that certain hey dude stars’ iconic tresses aren’t natural (we’re looking at you, Mandy Moore). But, while the following celebrities could likely rock any kind of locks, there’s something undeniably cool about seeing their authentic hair. It’s like peeking behind the Great and Powerful Oz’s curtain.

Here are a few of Hollywood’s natural hair transformations that’ll surprise you — they very well may inspire you to update your own.

Mandy Moore
Mandy Moore before and after natural hair
Close your eyes and picture Mandy Moore. You’re thinking of Rebecca Pearson from This Is Us, aren’t you? Ever since NBC introduced the hit tear-jerking series, it’s become difficult to separate Moore from her TV mom persona. So difficult, in fact, that it’s rare for us to recollect that the star actually got her start as a teen belting out bubblegum pop in the ’90s.

Although Moore’s mane has been chestnut brown for more than hoka shoes a decade now, her hair’s original hue is closer to her circa 1999 “Candy” music video blonde. In an interview with PopSugar in 2017, Moore said those OG locks make her “shudder a little bit to myself” — her trademark brown “feels the most like me.”

It’s no wonder she never looked back after dying her hair darker for 2002’s A Walk to Remember. She told Entertainment Weekly. “It was transformative because it came at a time in my life when I was only seen from the pop music landscape and through that lens. There was a real significance to coloring my hair.”

Zendaya
Zendaya before and after natural hair
When you step into the spotlight as young as Zendaya did (she was barely a teen when she landed the role of Rocky Blue on Shake It Up), your “look” can become synonymous with who you are. For years, Zendaya straightened her naturally curly hair to align with her public image. “Growing up, I wasn’t very confident in my curls,” she told People StyleWatch (via Mic). “It wasn’t like the hair that girls around me had. And nobody really knew what to do with my hair.”

Fast forward to January 2017, and The Greatest Showman star shared insight into her natural hair journey: “When you’ve spent the past however many years growing your damaged hair back, avoiding heat, wearing wigs and trying every natural product in the world and you finally see a little curl pattern comin back,” Zendaya wrote on Instagram, underscoring the sentiment with multiple praise hands emojis. In the time since, she’s rocked it everywhere from award shows to movie premieres, and often doles out advice on caring for natural black hair.

Blake Lively

Blake Lively before and after natural hair

Blake Lively is a bona fide movie star, and the wife of Deadpool’s Ryan Reynolds. But to fans of the iconic teen drama Gossip Girl, Lively will always be Serena van der Woodsen. It was during her years on the show that Lively first elicited hair lust in, well, everyone. She had (and still has) the highly sought-after beachy blonde waves that hair dreams are made of.

Hair deity that she is, it wouldn’t be hard to believe she was born hey dude shoes with these enviable locks. In reality, though, little Lively was born with hair considerably darker than her signature blonde shade. She nearly broke the internet during her pregnancies when she stopped dyeing and revealed her real roots. Lively’s colorist, Rona O’Connor of the Lukaro Salon, confirmed to Allure in 2011 that, yes, Lively makes regular visits to maintain her “natural warm blonde” with “ivory highlights.”

That isn’t the only hair revelation Lively has hidden up her sleeve. At one point, it was even super curly — just like her daughter James’!

Why Many Black Americans Changed Their Minds About COVID Shots

TUSKEGEE, Ala. — By the time vaccines for the coronavirus were introduced late last year, the pandemic had taken two of Lucenia Williams Dunn’s close friends. Still, Dunn, a former mayor of Tuskegee, contemplated for months whether to be inoculated.

It was a complicated consideration, framed by the government’s botched response to the pandemic,brooks shoes its disproportionate toll on Black communities and an infamous 40-year government experiment for which her hometown is often associated.

“I thought about the vaccine most every day,” said Dunn, 78, who finally walked into a pharmacy this summer and rolled up her sleeve for a shot, convinced after weighing with her family and doctor the possible consequences of remaining unvaccinated.

“What people need to understand is some of the hesitancy is rooted in a horrible history, and for some, it’s truly a process of asking the right questions to get to a place of getting the vaccine.”

In the first months after the vaccine rollout, Black Americans were far less likely than white Americans to be vaccinated. In addition to the difficulty of obtaining shots in their communities, their hesitancy was fueled by a powerful combination of general mistrust of the government and medical institutions, and misinformation over the safety and efficacy of the vaccines.

But a wave of pro-vaccine campaigns and a surge of virus hospitalizations and deaths this summer, mostly among the unvaccinated and caused by the highly contagious delta variant, have narrowed the gap, experts say. So, too, have the Food and Drug Administration’s full approval of a vaccine and new employer mandates. A steadfast resistance to vaccines in some white communities may also have contributed to the lessening disparity.

While gaps persist in some regions, by late September, according to the most recent survey by the Kaiser Family Foundation, a roughly equal share of Black, white and Hispanic adult populations — 70% of Black adults, 71% of white adults and 73% of Hispanic adults — had received at least one vaccine dose. A Pew study in late August revealed similar patterns. Federal data shows a larger racial gap, but that data is missing demographic information for many vaccine recipients.

Since May, when vaccines were widely available to a majority of adults across the country, monthly surveys by Kaiser have shown steady improvement in vaccination rates among Black Americans.

How the racial gap was narrowed — after months of disappointing turnout and limited access — is a testament to decisions made in many states to send familiar faces to knock on doors and dispel myths about the vaccines’ effectiveness, provide internet access to make appointments and offer transportation to vaccine sites.

In North Carolina, which requires vaccine providers to collect race and ethnicity data, hospital systems and community groups conducted door-to-door canvassing and hosted pop-up clinics at a theme park, a bus station clarks shoes uk and churches. Over the summer, the African American share of the vaccinated population began to more closely mirror the African American share of the general population.

In Mississippi, which has one of the country’s worst vaccination rates and began similar endeavors, 38% of people who have started the vaccine process are Black, a share that is roughly equal to the Black share of Mississippi’s population.

And in Alabama, public awareness campaigns and rides to vaccination sites helped transform dismal inoculation rates. A store owner and county commissioner in Panola, a tiny rural town near the Mississippi border, led the effort to vaccinate nearly all of her majority Black community.

Today, about 40% of Black Alabama residents — up from about 28% in late April — have had at least one dose, a feat in a state that has ranked among the lowest in overall vaccination rates and highest in per capita deaths from COVID-19. About 39% of white people in the state have had one dose, up from 31% in late April.

Health officials and community leaders say that those who remain unvaccinated have pointed to concerns about how quickly the vaccines were developed and what their long-term health effects might be, plus disinformation such as whether they contain tracking devices or change people’s DNA. The damage wrought by the government-backed trials in Tuskegee, in which Black families were misled by health care professionals, also continues to play a role in some communities, helping to explain why some African Americans have still held out.

“It’s less about saying, ‘This racial ethnic group is more hesitant, more unwilling to get vaccinated,’ and more about saying, ‘You know, this group of people in this given area or this community doesn’t have the information or access they need to overcome their hesitancy,’ ” said Nelson Dunlap, chief of staff for the Satcher Health Leadership Institute at the Morehouse School of Medicine in Atlanta.

When the U.S. Public Health Service began what it called the “Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis in the Negro Male,” 600 Black men — 399 with syphilis and 201 without the disease — were told they would be treated for so-called bad blood in exchange for free medical exams, meals and burial insurance. In reality, treatment was withheld. Even after penicillin was discovered as an effective treatment, most did not receive the antibiotic.

The experiment began in 1932 and did not stop until 1972, and only after it was exposed in a news article. The surviving men and the heirs of those who had died were later awarded a settlement totaling about $10 million, and the exposure of the study itself eventually led to reforms in medical research. Still, the damage endured.

“Few families escaped the study. Everyone here knows someone who was in the study,” said Omar Neal, 64, a radio show host and former Tuskegee mayor who counts three relatives in the study and who wavered on a vaccine before finally getting one, his mind changed by the rising number of deaths. “And the betrayal — because that is what the study was — is often conjured whenever people are questioning something related to mistrusting medicine or science.”

Rueben C. Warren, director of the National Center for Bioethics in Research and Health Care at Tuskegee University, said the study was a real example in the long line of medical exploitation and neglect experienced by Black Americans, eroding trust in the government and health care systems.

“The questions being asked about the vaccine should be understood in the larger context of historic inequities in health care,” Warren said. “The hope, of course, is they finally decide to get the vaccine.”

A national campaign led by the Ad Council and COVID Collaborative, a coalition of experts, tackled the hesitation. This summer, a short-form documentary including descendants of the men in the Tuskegee study was added to the campaign.

When Deborah Riley Draper, who created the short-form documentary, interviewed descendants of the Tuskegee study, she was struck by how shrouded it was in myths and misconceptions, such as the false claim that the government had injected the men with syphilis.

“The descendants’ message was clear that African Americans are as much a part of public health as any other group and we need to fight for access and information,” she said.

In Macon County, Alabama, which has a population of about 18,000 and is home to many descendants of the Tuskegee trials, about 45% of Black residents have hey dude shoes received at least one vaccine dose. Community leaders, including those who are part of a task force that meets weekly, attribute the statistic, in part, to local outreach and education campaigns and numerous conversations about the difference between the Tuskegee study and the coronavirus vaccines.

For months, Martin Daniel, 53, and his wife, Trina Daniel, 49, resisted the vaccines, their uncertainty blamed in part on the study. Their nephew Cornelius Daniel, a dentist in Hampton, Georgia, said he grew up hearing about the research from his uncle and saw in his own family how the long-running deception had sown generational distrust of medical institutions.

Cornelius Daniel, 31, said he overcame his own hesitation in the spring because the risks of working in patients’ mouths outweighed his concerns.

His uncle and aunt reconsidered their doubts more slowly, but over the summer, as the delta variant led to a surge in hospitalizations across the South, the Daniels made vaccination appointments for mid-July. Before the date arrived, though, they and their two teenage children tested positive for the coronavirus.

On July 6, the couple, inseparable since meeting as students on the campus of Savannah State University, died about six hours apart. Their children are now being raised by Cornelius Daniel and his wife, Melanie Daniel, 32.

“We truly believe the vaccine would have saved their lives,” Melanie Daniel said.

Biden’s Proposal to Empower IRS Rattles Banks and Their Customers

Jill Castilla, chief executive of the one-branch Citizens Bank of Edmond, outside the bank in Edmond, Okla., on Wednesday, Oct. 6, 2021. (Nick Oxford/The New York Times)
Jill Castilla, chief executive of the one-branch Citizens Bank of Edmond, outside the bank in Edmond, Okla., on Wednesday, Oct. 6, 2021.

When the Biden administration looked for ways to pay for the president’s expansive social policy bill, it proposed raising revenue by cracking down on $7 trillion in unpaid taxes, mostly from wealthy Americans and businesses.

To help find those funds, the administration wants banks to give the Internal Revenue Service new details keen shoes keen shoes on their customers and provide data for accounts with total annual deposits or withdrawals worth more than $600. That has sparked an uproar among banks and Republican lawmakers, who say giving the IRS such power would be an enormous breach of privacy and government overreach.

Banks and their trade groups are running advertising and letter-writing campaigns to raise awareness — and concern — about the proposal. As a result, banks from Denver to Philadelphia say they are being deluged with calls, emails and in-person complaints from both savers and small-business owners worried about the proposal. JPMorgan Chase & Co. has issued talking points to bank tellers on what to tell angry customers who call or come into a branch to complain.

“We have heard a lot from our customers about their concerns about their privacy,” said Jill Castilla, the chief executive of the one-branch Citizens Bank of Edmond, just outside Oklahoma City. “I’ve gotten calls, emails, and then we’ve had many customers come in.”

Banks already submit tax forms to the IRS about the interest that customer accounts accrue. But the new proposal would require they share information about account balances so that the IRS can see if there are large discrepancies between the income people and businesses report and what they have in the bank. The IRS could audit or investigate the gaps to see if those taxpayers are evading their obligations.

Biden administration officials say the United States needs more information from taxpayers to crack down on those who do not pay what they owe. The measure, which would affect more than 100 million households and millions of businesses, is estimated to capture $460 billion in additional revenue over a decade, primarily from the wealthiest Americans.

“This is a very serious policy brooks shoes proposal,” Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen said at a congressional hearing last month. “We have a $7 trillion estimated tax gap that we have a great deal of tax avoidance by individuals and businesses — typically very high-net worth, high-income individuals and businesses that have opaque sources of income that are not paying the taxes that are due.”

Treasury officials say the effort is not about tracking individual transactions and is not aimed at lower- or middle-class households. The $600 threshold was chosen to weed out accounts that are generally dormant or get little use, such as children’s accounts, while still giving the government the broadest possible visibility. Administration officials say audit rates for taxpayers who earn less than $400,000 per year will not go up.

“This is about making sure the top 1% can’t evade $160 billion per year in taxes,” said Alexandra LaManna, a Treasury Department spokesperson.

Top Democrats say that empowering the IRS is key to making the economy more fair. Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts has warned that the IRS is handicapped when it comes to tracking the income of the wealthiest.

“The kinds of income that the IRS has the least visibility into are the kinds of income that are overwhelmingly concentrated among the very richest taxpayers,” Warren said. “Strengthening information reporting, as well as providing protected and sustained IRS funding, would ensure that we focus enforcement on the biggest fish.”

But the pushback is putting pressure on the Biden administration to scale back the proposal. Lawmakers are discussing raising the required disclosure level to $10,000 rather than $600, a Treasury official said, and making taxpayers who are paid through payroll-processing companies exempt from the required reporting. The Treasury estimates that could reduce the amount of money it could recoup to between $200 billion and $250 billion over a decade.

The outcry over the proposed measures stems in large part from a carefully planned lobbying campaign by the banking industry, which has spent months raising awareness and opposition to the plan in cities and towns across the country.

Banks say the reporting requirements would raise their costs and put them in the unenviable position of handing customer information over to the IRS.

Top industry trade groups have hammered the proposal in emails and phone calls to members. They have argued their case in clarks shoes uk meetings with senior administration officials, including Yellen and Charles Rettig, who runs the IRS. They established a social media hashtag, #KeepMyBankingPrivate, that some executives have used in sharing their doubts about the proposal.

“We proudly join @ICBA and others in telling Congress that we serve our customers, not the IRS,” Bankcda, whose main branch is in Coeur d’Alene, Idaho, wrote in a recent Twitter post tagging the Independent Community Bankers of America, a trade group that caters to smaller banks and is helping to lead opposition to the measure.

After the initiative made its first appearance deep in the Treasury’s annual budget proposal in May, the American Bankers Association said it and its state-level partner groups quickly heard from hundreds of member banks, raising questions about the idea and its implications. The Independent Community Bankers of America began flagging the potential changes to its members, prompting many of them in turn to alert their customers.

Trade groups also helped gather signatures for a Sept. 17 letter to congressional leaders complaining about the proposal.

“Indiscriminate, blanket data collection would amount to a troubling effort to profile American taxpayers based on account characteristics without grounds for suspicion of tax evasion,” the letter argued. It was signed by more than 40 business groups, including the Mortgage Bankers Association, Global Cold Chain Alliance and Foodservice Equipment Distributors Association.

Awareness of the proposal has been amplified by ad campaigns, conservative news media coverage and Facebook posts, including one that caught the attention of Crystal Causey, a 39-year-old advertising account executive in Los Angeles.

“I wouldn’t allow my husband or my parents to monitor my bank account activity,” she said in an email. “There’s no way I would be OK with the government monitoring it.”

Industry representatives say it is unusual to see banks communicate with their account holders on a political matter. “This is the first time in 20 years that I’ve seen that banks have reached out to inform their customers on an issue” like this, said Paul Merski, who runs congressional relations for the community bankers association.

Jim Reuter, the chief executive of FirstBank near Denver, said concerns about the potential provisions have bubbled up frequently, including over a coffee he had with a small-business owner in early October.

“Their upshot is, ‘I pay my taxes, so why would you be sending additional information to the IRS?’” Reuter recalled. “I said I agree with them. We’re in the trust business. And it just goes without saying that sending the customer’s information somewhere without giving consent — that’s not what we do as a bank.”

The proposal’s critics have said the IRS appears ill-equipped to process and safeguard such an overwhelming amount of data to actually catch cheats.

“I have to tell you the proposal hey dude shoes that has been put forth about expanding the amount of information that the IRS is going to get on private bank accounts has been something I’ve been asked about at parks, at grocery stores, at convenience stores around the district,” Rep. Trey Hollingsworth, R-Ind., told Yellen at the congressional hearing last month. “This has people deeply afraid about the emergence of an apparatus that can be used against them.”

J.P. Freire, a spokesperson for Rep. Kevin Brady of Texas, the top Republican on the House Ways and Means Committee, said Texans were “terrified” of the IRS and that his boss was fielding inquiries about the proposed disclosures from at least three or four constituents every week.

Castilla, the community banker in Oklahoma, said a local schoolteacher had stopped by her office two weeks ago to share her anxieties about the idea of the government peering into her financial records. She told the teacher she believed the proposal was an overreach, Castilla recalled, and added that banking associations and Oklahoma’s congressional delegation were fighting it.

Even if the dollar threshold were raised to $10,000, Castilla said, it would still be onerous for her bank. “This would require a massive amount of infrastructure,” she said.

Treasury officials say they are flummoxed by the outrage, given that banks of all sizes initially told them they could comply with the rules, which would not take effect until 2024.

“They have made clear during conversations with banks that firms can easily implement a simple proposal like the one under consideration in Congress, and that any compliance costs would be minimal,” said LaManna, the Treasury spokeswoman.

The Yankees are out of answers for their mounting track record of postseason disappointment

BOSTON – After the New York Yankees lost 6-2 at Fenway Park on Tuesday night to ring in the 2021 postseason in front of a jubilant, raucous sellout crowd and, just as quickly, shut the door on yet another frustratingly brief October appearance for their own storied franchise, Gerrit Cole sat on Zoom at a loss for answers that likely don’t exist.

The Yankees ace and $324 million man lasted just two innings plus three batters. Which is unique in that it was his shortest outing of the season and tied for the shortest outing of his career, a disaster in a season where he was named an All-Star and could win the AL Cy Young. brooks shoes But it was also the culmination of a pattern for a pitcher who had a 5.13 ERA in September and gave up 15 runs in 17 2/3 innings over his previous three starts.

Maybe a tight left hamstring, which first proved to be a problem in a start against Toronto about a month ago, was responsible.

“No,” Cole said, definitive on that much, looking as sick to his stomach as he claimed to feel in the wake of his third career loss in a winner-take-all postseason game.

So then what was it? What was the common denominator in a string of disappointing starts that could be considered isolated anomalies if not for all the other similarly anomalous outings that surrounded them? Try as reporters might, they couldn’t coax a throughline, a diagnosable — and thus solvable — weakness from the generally thoughtful pitcher.

“It just wasn’t the same answer every time,” Cole said.

And then, when the questions kept coming, he explained with unassailable logic and almost profound poignancy that if he had known what was wrong, he would have tried to fix it before such a high stakes moment.

“I just didn’t perform the way I wanted to perform.”

Taken together, those sentiments define the recent era in the Bronx. This season made it five straight playoff appearances for the Yankees, and five straight playoff runs that have ended before the World Series even began; clarks shoes uk they haven’t played in the Fall Classic in 12 years now. And even though they haven’t looked perfect on paper — no team does, especially in the harsh light of elimination — the decade-plus of October futility defies payroll, projections and expectations.

And the most confounding part is if you analyze each lost season you’ll find: It wasn’t the same problem every time, they just didn’t perform. But also that the weaknesses exposed in the pressure-cooker of the postseason reflect an almost definitional failure to build a better approach before then. October ostensibly offers a fresh start, a chance for anything to happen — but if you can’t identify what’s wrong going in, you’re likely to repeat it.

BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS - OCTOBER 05: Manager Aaron Boone #17 takes out Gerrit Cole #45 of the New York Yankees against the Boston Red Sox during the third inning of the American League Wild Card game at Fenway Park on October 05, 2021 in Boston, Massachusetts. (Photo by Winslow Townson/Getty Images)
Yankees Gerrit Cole hands over the ball to Aaron Boone after the Red Sox jumped on him to take a decisive lead in the AL wild-card game.

A tough play, a tough game, a tough season …

The argument against the current two-team one-and-done wild-card format is that any one game can be fluky, running contrary to the broader contours of a team’s strengths or season. A single do-or-die contest is thrilling, but it can’t be indicative of what defined a team over the six-month regular season.

That’s the conventional wisdom, anyway. But the Yankees managed to fit a meaningful vignette of their tantalizing but flawed season into a single half-inning sequence.

Their best hope came in the top of the sixth.

Red Sox starter Nathan Eovaldi had cruised through five scoreless innings of two-hit ball on 64 pitches as a usually disciplined Yankees lineup chased and failed to draw a single walk. The 31-year-old Eovaldi has quietly had a career-defining, dominant season. His 5.4 fWAR is third in all of baseball among pitchers, hey dude shoes ahead of Max Scherzer and Walker Buehler and Gerrit Cole. He’s throwing harder than he has all season, he has better command than in previous years, and he’s added a deceptive quick pitch.

It was enough to easily subdue a Yankees lineup that had ranked third in slugging and second in home runs in 2019, but finished eighth in home runs and 17th in slugging during the 2021 regular season.

“That’s obviously been our calling card here for the last several years,” manager Aaron Boone will say after the game about the vaunted offensive potential that stayed largely locked inside his lineup of superhero-sized men. “And then this year, wasn’t the case. We struggled at times. We didn’t score runs like we normally would.”

But in that sixth inning, finally, the bats roused — a home run from Anthony Rizzo, a single from Aaron Judge and the Red Sox turned to the bullpen for Giancarlo Stanton, who had already hit one off the Green Monster.

He did it again, swatting a 114.9 mph drive off the top of Fenway’s signature wall in deep left-center field. Stanton thought the ball was far enough to go out, and third-base coach Phil Nevin thought it was far enough to wave Judge home. They were both wrong.

Nevin sent Judge and followed him toward the plate, and was only feet away when shortstop Xander Bogaerts’ perfect relay — the Red Sox led baseball in outfield assists — beat Judge by enough time for you to scream “Yankees suck!” before the tag was applied.

Not that Nevin needed to be up close to know what the out would look like: The Yankees tied for the major-league lead this year with 22 outs at home plate. Bad baserunning was one of the most galling and maddening features of the Yankees’ worst stretches this season.

“That was better than a home run for me personally,” said Bogaerts, who had launched a two-run shot in the first off Cole. “I mean if that run scores, it’s 3-2. Stanton is at second base, the whole momentum is on their side. The dugout is getting pumped up. As Judge was out at home, I saw Stanton was pretty mad.

“That changed the game. That changed the momentum big time.”

Stanton agreed — both that it squashed the Yankees’ much-needed momentum and that he had been pretty upset. It wasn’t the decision to send Judge — he called the play “bang-bang,” which is demonstrably untrue, but doesn’t matter — he took issue with. Rather, it was the dimensions of their nemeses’ den.

“I was upset that that probably would have left most anywhere, that would have changed the course of the game,” he said, although he’s proven quite capable of getting it over the Monster in the past.

It’s ironic, almost. Because the game would have been somewhere else — in Yankee Stadium, specifically — if the Yankees had managed just one more win this season. Just one more win than a Red Sox team a year removed from trading Mookie Betts, signaling something of a rebuild, in the same offseason where the Yankees ponied up for Cole.

BOSTON, MA - OCTOBER 05: (L-R) Aaron Boone #17 Anthony Rizzo #48 Aaron Judge #99 Giancarlo Stanton #27 of the New York Yankees during the national anthem prior to the game between the New York Yankees and the Boston Red Sox at Fenway Park on Tuesday, October 5, 2021 in Boston, Massachusetts. (Photo by Rob Tringali/MLB Photos via Getty Images)
The Yankees have made the postseason in five straight seasons, but fallen short of the World Series each time. 

Have the Yankees lost their edge?

Though they showed flashes and streaks of dominance, the 2021 Yankees — expected to be the best team in the league — barely snuck into the playoffs on the final day of the regular season. If that wasn’t a wake-up call, it should have been.

After the game, Boone, casting about for how to eulogize what he has repeatedly called a “challenging year,” said the problem is that the rest of baseball caught up with the Yankees.

“The league’s closed the gap on us. We’ve got to get better in every aspect,” he said. “Because it’s not just the Red Sox and the Astros now in our league. Look at our division, the Rays are a beast, Toronto, there’s some teams in the Central that are better and better, teams in the West that are better and better, teams that have closed the gap on us.”

On Twitter, fans and critics alike complained that the Yankees under Boone haven’t earned the opportunity to position themselves ahead of the pack. But if anything, the analysis was searingly damning.

Whether he intended this or not, it sounds like the hoka shoes team got caught getting complacent. As the Yankees racked up unsatisfying postseason berths, the rest of the league started building championship winners. And now they’re left hunting for the common denominator in a string of disappointing seasons that could be considered isolated anomalies if not for all the other similarly anomalous seasons that surrounded them.

Their next high-stakes moment is at least a year away — whether Boone, whose contract expires after this season, is still manager remains to be seen — which should give them plenty of time for self-reflection. If they can’t identify what went wrong before then, they’re liable to keep repeating it.

Brian Laundrie’s family called the police after Dog the Bounty Hunter showed up on their property

Dog the Bounty Hunter stands in front of a brick wall
Dog the Bounty Hunter in 2019. 
  • Brian Laundrie’s parents called the police on Dog the Bounty Hunter over the weekend.
  • He has joined the search to find Laundrie and showed up at the family’s Florida home Saturday.
  • The North Port Police Department responded to a 911 call from the family on the matter, police said.
  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Brian Laundrie’s parents called the police on Duane “Dog the Bounty Hunter” Chapman after he showed up at their Florida home over the weekend, police confirmed to Insider Monday.

The North Port Police Department responded to a 911 call from Laundrie’s family on Saturday. The family said Chapman was on the property of their North Port home, hey dude Josh Taylor, a spokesman for the police department, said.

The reality-TV star, who has joined the search to find Laundrie, the fiancé of Gabby Petito, was seen knocking on the door of the Laundrie family home on Saturday.

“We did not tell him to leave,” Taylor told Insider in reference to Chapman. “He left on his own.”

In an interview with Fox News on Monday, Chapman said “it’s a shame” that Laundrie’s family “wouldn’t speak with us.”

“The police said we were welcome to knock on the door so we did,” Chapman said. “I wanted to tell the Laundries that our goal is to find Brian and bring him in alive.”

Laundrie, 23, has been the subject of a massive search since his parents reported him missing to police on September 17 – just two days after he was named a person of interest in the disappearance of the 22-year-old Petito.

His parents told police that Laundrie went out for a hike at Sarasota County’s Carlton Reserve with only a backpack three days earlier and never returned to their North Port home.

Authorities have been searching the 25,000-acre nature preserve for more than a week for Laundrie. But Taylor told Insider on Monday that search efforts there would be “scaled back” this week.

Petito’s body was found at a remote campsite in Wyoming on September 19, and her death was later ruled a homicide, according to a coroner’s initial findings.

Last week, a federal court in Wyoming issued an arrest warrant for Laundrie in connection with the case.

Chapman said in a “Fox & Friends” interview hoka shoes on Monday that he had gotten more than 1,000 tips since he joined the search for Laundrie.

“We’re going through all those leads right now,” Chapman said. “I would say within 48 hours, we probably will have a location where we start the tracking at.”

Laundrie and Petito set out on a cross-country road trip from New York on July 2, and Laundrie returned to Florida on September 1 with the van the couple was traveling in but without Petito.