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Ukraine’s richest man vows to rebuild besieged Mariupol

Ukraine’s richest man has pledged to help rebuild the besieged city of Mariupol, a place close to his heart where he owns two vast steelworks that he says will once again compete globally.

Rinat Akhmetov has seen his business empire shattered by eight years of fighting in Ukraine’s east but remains defiant, sure that what he calls “our brave soldiers” will defend the Sea of Azov city reduced to a wasteland by seven weeks of bombardment.
A shoemaker, a pizza shop and a bakery in Kyiv pivot to serve their country
For now, though, his Metinvest company, Ukraine’s biggest steelmaker, has announced it cannot deliver its supply contracts, and while his financial and industrial SCM Group is servicing its debt obligations, his private power producer DTEK “has optimized payment of its debts” in an agreement with creditors.
“Mariupol is a global tragedy and a global example of heroism. For me, Mariupol has swarovski jewelry been and will always be a Ukrainian city,” Akhmetov said in written answers to questions from Reuters.
“I believe that our brave soldiers will defend the city, though I understand how difficult and hard it is for them,” he said, adding he was in daily contact with the Metinvest managers who run the Azovstal and Illich Iron and Steel Works plants in Mariupol.
On Friday, Metinvest said it would never operate under Russian occupation and that the Mariupol siege had disabled more than a third of Ukraine’s metallurgy production capacity.
Akhmetov praised President Volodymyr Zelensky’s “passion and professionalism” during the war, seemingly smoothing relations after the Ukrainian leader last year said plotters hoping to overthrow his government had tried to involve the businessman.
Here are the companies pulling back from Russia
Akhmetov called the allegation “an absolute lie” at the time.
“And the war is certainly not the time to be at odds… We will rebuild the entire Ukraine,” he said, adding that he returned to the country on February 23 and had been there ever since.
‘A Marshall Plan for Ukraine’
Akhmetov did not say where exactly he was, but that he had been in Mariupol on February 16, the day some western intelligence services had expected the invasion to begin. “I talked to people in the streets, I met with workers…,” he said.
“My ambition is to return to a Ukrainian Mariupol and implement our (new production) plans so that Mariupol-produced steel can compete in global markets as before.”
Russia invaded on February 24 when President Vladimir Putin announced a “special operation” to demilitarize and “denazify” the country. Kyiv and its Western allies reject that as a false pretext for an unprovoked attack.
Yellen: Russia-Ukraine war is reshaping global economy
Akhmetov, long Ukraine’s richest man, has seen his business empire shrink since 2014, when Russia annexed the Black Sea peninsula of Crimea and two eastern Ukrainian regions — Donetsk and Luhansk — proclaimed independence from Kyiv.
According to Forbes magazine, Akhmetov’s net worth in 2013 reached $15.4 billion. It currently stands at $3.9 billion.
“For us, the war broke out in 2014. We lost all of our assets both in Crimea and in the temporarily occupied territory of Donbas. We lost our businesses, but it made us tougher and stronger,” he said.
“I am confident that, as the country’s biggest private business, SCM will play a key role in the post-war reconstruction of Ukraine,” he said, citing officials as coach outlet saying the damage from the war has reached $1 trillion.
“We will definitely need an unprecedented international reconstruction program, a Marshall Plan for Ukraine,” he said, in reference to the US aid project that helped rebuild Western Europe after World War II.
“I trust that we all will rebuild a free, European, democratic, and successful Ukraine after our victory in this war.”

Man dressed as Joker injures 17 on Tokyo train

A man brandishing a knife on a Tokyo commuter train stabbed several passengers before starting a fire, which sent people scrambling to escape and jumping from windows, police and witnesses said.

The Tokyo Fire Department said 17 passengers were injured, including three seriously.

Not all of them were stabbed and most of the injuries were not serious, the agency said.

The attacker, only identified as a man in his 20s, salomon boots was arrested on the spot and was being investigated on suspicion of attempted murder, NHK said.

His motive was not immediately known.

Nippon Television reported that the suspect told police he used an earlier train stabbing case as an example.

NHK said witnesses told police that the attacker was wearing a bright outfit, a green shirt, a blue suit and a purple coat, and looked like a comic book character or someone going to a Halloween event.

Tokyo police officials said the attack happened inside the Keio train near the Kokuryo station.

Television footage showed a number of firefighters, police officials and paramedics rescuing the passengers, many of whom escaped through train windows.

In one video, passengers were running from another car, where flames were gushing.

NHK said the suspect, after stabbing passengers, poured a liquid resembling oil and set fire, which partially burned seats.

Shunsuke Kimura, who filmed the video, told NHK that he saw passengers desperately running and while he was trying to figure out what happened, he heard an explosive noise and saw smoke wafting.

He also jumped from a sperry shoes window but fell on the platform and hurt his shoulder.

“Train doors were closed and we had no idea what was happening, and we jumped from the windows,” Mr Kimura said.

“It was horrifying.”

The attack was the second involving a knife on a Tokyo train in two months.

In August, the day before the Tokyo Olympics closing ceremony, a 36-year-old man stabbed 10 passengers on a commuter train in Tokyo in a random burst of violence.

The suspect later told police that he wanted to attack women who looked happy.

While shooting deaths are rare in Japan, the country has had a series of high-profile knife killings in recent years.

In 2019, a man carrying two knives attacked a group of schoolgirls waiting at a bus stop just outside Tokyo, killing two people and injuring 17 before killing himself.

In 2018, a man killed a passenger and injuring two others in a knife attack on a bullet train.

In 2016, a former employee at a home for the disabled killed 19 people and injured more than 20.

Apple is being sued by a San Francisco man for $1,383.13, the exact cost of his iPhone 12. He says the company refused to fix the device while it was under warranty.

An old San Francisco building is reflected inside the glossy Apple store logo
San Francisco’s Apple Store. 
  • An Apple iPhone owner sued the tech giant for $1,383.13, the exact cost of his phone.
  • Theodore A. Kim filed the lawsuit in San Francisco Superior Court last week.
  • Kim said the company refused to repair his iPhone despite it being under warranty.

An iPhone user in San Francisco has sued Apple for the exact cost of his iPhone, saying the company refused to repair the device despite it being under warranty.

Theodore A. Kim filed a lawsuit in San Francisco seeking $1,383.13, the original cost of his phone. The claim was filed in small claims court.

“It levels the playing field so that just a dr martens boots simple consumer like me can sue a big company without having to worry about getting lawyers and all that other stuff,” Kim told Insider in a phone interview last week. “I feel like at least I want my day in court.”

The court clerk set a trial for 1.30 p.m. on November 23, 2021, according to documents. Apple didn’t respond to Insider’s requests for comment.

The phone Kim’s suing over was originally purchased from an authorized Apple seller in Vietnam in October 2020, he said. The iPhone 12 was under Apple’s warranty until October 2022, he said.

When Kim returned to the US during the pandemic, he was having trouble getting the phone to read a US sim card. So he called Apple, and they told him to bring it into a local Apple Store.

“And so I brought it into the store and they sent it to the repair depot – then they came back and said, ‘Yeah, we’re not going to fix this because it’s been tampered with,'” Kim said. “And I said: ‘Tampered with in what way?'”

He didn’t get an answer, he said. Instead, they returned the phone. But now it had a broken SIM tray, Kim said.

A few weeks later, Kim filed a complaint with the Better Business Bureau (BBB). Apple responded to that complaint, saying the iPhone would have been repaired if it had been broken while the company had it.

“Apple considers this matter closed,” the company said, according to the BBB website.

Since Apple wouldn’t fix the phone under the warranty – which Kim said was voided by the company – he offered to pay for the repair. But the company again refused, he said.

As a final gambit, he sent an email to Apple CEO Tim Cook’s email address in late June. He didn’t hear back. So he turned to Google for ways to solve the problem.

“And I found a blog post of someone in Seattle successfully suing Apple in small claims court,” Kim said.

In that 2012 case, a blogger brought Apple to small claims court in steve madden shoes Washington after his 2008 MacBook Pro’s graphics card died. That blogger’s experience was similar enough to his that Kim thought he might have a chance in court.

“So I said, ‘Well, OK, why don’t I try the same avenue,'” he said. “I kind of jokingly said, ‘Well, this is like a David and Goliath kind of situation.’ We’ll see what happens.”

‘Soul Man’ at 35: How a young Spike Lee helped take down ‘the most offensive movie ever’

SOUL MAN, from left: C. Thomas Howell, Rae Dawn Chong, 1986. ©New World Pictures/courtesy Everett Co
C. Thomas Howell and Rae Dawn Chong in 1986’s Soul Man.

Whether it’s the effects of a continually progressing society or the more diabolical wrath of so-called “cancel culture,” there have been countless movies from decades past — fair or not — being re-scrutinized through a contemporary lens in recent years.

And then there’s the case of 1986’s Soul Man.

Released in theaters 35 years ago today, the comedy about a rich white law student (C. Thomas Howell) who poses as a Black man in order to qualify for a scholarship to Harvard was canceled almost immediately after its release.

Almost, that is. The film, reportedly made for a budget of $4.5 million and distributed by New World Pictures, hauled in $35 million at the U.S. box office, making it a commercial success that out-grossed other popular brooks shoes films that year like WildcatsThree Amigos!Iron EagleSpikes Like UsF/XFlight of the Navigator and Children of a Lesser God.

Still, the blowback was quick. Here was a film that’s main character Mark Watson (Howell) wore blackface throughout. Taking tanning pills to darken his face, wearing an Afro wig and putting on a one-man minstrel show, Watson was the ‘80s cinematic equivalent of disgraced former college instructor and Spokane NAACP chapter president Rachel Dolezal.

Upon its release, the NAACP railed against it. Students at UCLA protested outside of a theater screening it. “We find the Al Jolson-like portrayal of the main character offensive and trivializing,” wrote the university’s Black American Law Students Association, referencing the infamous blackface performer and star of The Jazz Singer. And a young filmmaker named Spike Lee, who was just breaking out with his feature directorial debut She’s Gotta Have It, put it on blast during an uncomfortable appearance on The Dick Cavett Show.

“The whole premise is that he’s passing as Black, and it’s so phony, that means all the Black people in the movie are idiots… that they could think that this guy is Black,” said Lee, who had watched clips from the movie but refused to see it in full.

“They’re trying to pass it off as an attack on racism. I really don’t see it that way. That’s not funny to me.”

Indeed, Soul Man was posited by its creators as exactly that: a well-intentioned comedy that teaches a white man he can’t understand racism until he’s the one being discriminated against. “A comedy with heart and soul,” read the tagline for the film, written by Carol Black (creator of future TV hits The Wonder Years and Ellen) and directed clarks shoes uk by Steve Miner. (The poster’s tagline was not nearly as bad as the trailer’s: “He didn’t give up… he got down.”)

“A white man donning blackface is taboo. Conversation over, you can’t win,” said Howell. “But our intentions were pure: We wanted to make a funny movie that had a message about racism.”

“It used comedy as a device to expose sexual stereotyping. I think Soul Man uses it to explode racial stereotyping,” said producer Steve Tisch, who compared the film’s plot the 1982 favorite Tootsie in which Dustin Hoffman dresses up as a woman to advance his career — and whom Lee mentioned called him after he began publicly putting the movie on blast in 1986.

But let’s remember the sociopolitical climate of the mid-1980s. The Reaganomics era was in full bloom, promising a trickle-down effect to low-income families that never came and ultimately widened the wealth gap between white and Black Americans. Affirmative action, which Mark Watson exploits in the film despite coming from a family of extreme wealth and (white) privilege, was as hot-button an issue as they come — a domestic program Reagan openly opposed.

“It’s really an attack on affirmative action,” Lee told Cavett during his talk show appearance.

How rich then that Soul Man happened to feature the president’s son Ron Reagan in a minor role in the supporting cast that also included Rae Dawn Chong, Leslie Nielsen, Julia Louis-Dreyfus and perhaps most perplexing, James Earl Jones. “The Reagans enjoyed the film and especially enjoyed seeing their son Ron,” a White House spokesman saiid after President Reagan and First Lady Nancy Reagan screened the film at Camp David.

No matter its intentions, Soul Man remains an indefensible disaster to many. Consider just a few cringeworthy moments, like the dinner sequence where — through the guise of white characters’ points of view — Howell also imitates a sex-craved savage who tears the blouse off a woman to the sounds of African tribal music, a sex-craved Prince and a sex-craved, jive-talking pimp sucking down watermelon.

It’s no wonder the film was “canceled” almost immediately — and decades before blackface episodes would come back to bite the likes of celebrities Jimmy Kimmel, Jimmy Fallon, Paula Deen and Megyn Kelly and politicians Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.

Howell and Chong, who married in 1989 after meeting on the film but divorced in 1990, remained supporters of the film well into the new millennium.

“This isn’t a movie that should be considered irresponsible on any level. This is a movie that is quite the opposite for me,” Howell told the AV Club in 2013. “I think it’s a really innocent movie with a very powerful message, hey dude shoes and it’s an important part of my life. I’m proud of the performance, and I’m proud of the people that were in it.”

The internet would disagree. YouTube essays on the film come with headers like “Is This the Worst Comedy of the 80s?,” “Soul Man Was Insensitive as Hell!” and “THE MOST OFFENSIVE MOVIE EVER!”

Chong, especially, has remained defiant about the film — and there’s a single person she blames for its swift and lasting downfall.

“It was only controversial because Spike Lee made a thing of it,” the actress said in a 2016 interview with The Wrap. “He’d never seen the movie and he just jumped all over it… He was just starting and pulling everything down in his wake. If you watch the movie, it’s really making white people look stupid.”

Fueled by Lee or not, it’s almost impressive how swiftly Soul Man met its downfall. This was decades before John Hughes movies were being re-evaluated for not aging well and Green Book, a film about a gay Black pianist touring the 1960s Deep South, was instantly being called problematic, or at least dated, upon its release, albeit on its way to winning Best Picture at the Oscars.

Still, don’t give 1986 too much credit. Four weeks after Soul Man’s premiere came a re-release of Song of the South, long considered Disney’s most racist movie and one of the most infamously offensive films of all time. Its re-release grossed over $17 million at the U.S. box office.

Five dead and more injured by man with bow and arrows in Kongsberg

 (via REUTERS)

At least five people have been killed and others injured by a man using a bow and arrows to carry out attacks in a Norwegian town, police have said.

Officers said a suspect had been detained following the incident in Kongsberg on Wednesday and that a probe was underway to establish whether the attack amounted to an act of terrorism.

“The man used a bow and arrow … for some of the attacks,” police chief Oeyvind Aas told reporters on Wednesday. steve madden shoes Officers were investigating whether other weapons had also been used, he said.

“The man has been apprehended … from the information we now have, this person carried out these actions alone,” police chief Oeyvind Aas told reporters, adding: “It’s natural to consider whether this was an act of terror.”

The man has not been questioned yet, and his motive was unknown, Mr Aas said.

Following the attacks, the police directorate said it had immediately ordered officers nationwide to carry firearms. Norwegian police are normally unarmed but officers have access to guns and rifles when needed.

“This is an extra precaution. The police have no indication so far that there is a change in the national threat level,” the directorate said in a statement.

The attacks took place over “a large area” of Kongsberg, a municipality of around 28,000 people in southeastern Norway, police said.

The attack began about 6.10pm local time. Police were alerted to the attack around 6.30pm and arrested the suspect about 20 minutes later.

Witnesses reported that the attack began at a Coop Extra store.

“I can confirm that there has been a serious incident in our Coop at Kongsberg,” spokesperson Silje Alisø told VG.

She said that none of their employees are physically injured.

Acting Prime Minister Erna Solberg described the attack as “gruesome” and said it was too early to speculate on the man’s motive.

She said the man has been taken to a police station in Drammen but he had not yet been questioned by investigators, who are still working to determine if the attack was an act of terrorism.

The prime minister-designate, ecco shoes Jonas Gahr Stoere, who is expected to take office on Thursday, called the assault “a cruel and brutal act” in comments to Norwegian news agency NTB.

“This is a gruesome incident, there is nothing else to say. Now we must try to take care of the inhabitants as best we can,” town mayor Kari Anne Sand told TV 2.

She said that the attack took place in the Vestiden area, which has housing, shops and a university campus.

Norway’s minister of justice and public security, Monica Maeland, has received updates on the attacks and was closely monitoring the situation, the ministry said.

City officials invited people who were affected by the attack and their relatives to gather for support at a local hotel.

The attack comes over a decade after Anders Behring Breivik, a right-wing extremist, set off a bomb in Oslo’s government district and then carried out a nike sneakers shooting massacre at the summer camp of the left-wing Labor Party’s youth organisation on Utoya island.

The violence on July 22, 2011, killed 77 people and stunned Norway.

Breivik was sentenced to 21 years in prison, the maximum under Norwegian law, but his term can be extended as long as he’s considered a danger to society.

Bow-and-arrow killings in Norway seen as an ‘act of terror’

KONGSBERG, Norway (AP) — The bow-and-arrow rampage by a man who killed five people in a small town near Norway’s capital appeared to be a terrorist act, authorities said Thursday, a bizarre and shocking attack in a Scandinavian country where violent crime is rare.

Police identified the attacker as Espen Andersen Braathen, a 37-year-old Danish citizen, who was arrested on the street Wednesday night about a half-hour after authorities were alerted.

They said he used the bow and arrow and possibly other weapons to randomly target people at a supermarket and other locations in Kongsberg, a town of about 26,000 where he lived.

Witnesses said their quiet neighborhood of wooden houses and birch trees was turned into a scene of terrifying cries and turmoil.

“The screaming was so intense and hoka shoes horrifying there was never any doubt something very serious was going on,” said Kurt Einar Voldseth, who had returned home from an errand when he heard the commotion. “I can only describe it as a ‘death scream,’ and it burned into my mind.”

Four women and a man between the ages of 50 and 70 were killed, and three other people were wounded, police said.

Andersen Braathen is being held on preliminary charges and will face a custody hearing Friday. Police said they believe he acted alone.

“The whole act appears to be an act of terror,” said Hans Sverre Sjoevold, head of Norway’s domestic intelligence service, known as the PST.

”We do not know what the motivation of the perpetrator is,” Sjoevold said in English. “We have to wait for the outcome of the investigation.”

He said the suspect was known to the PST, but he declined to elaborate. The agency said the terror threat level for Norway remained unchanged at “moderate.”

Regional Police Chief Ole B. Saeverud described the man as a Muslim convert and said there “earlier had been worries of the man having been radicalized,” but he did not elaborate or say why he was previously flagged or what authorities did in response.

Norwegian media reported the suspect had a conviction for burglary and drug possession, and last year a court granted a restraining order for him to stay away from his parents for six months after threatening to kill one of them.

Svane Mathiassen told broadcaster NRK the suspect will be examined by forensic psychiatric experts, which is “not unusual in such serious cases.”

Police were alerted to a man shooting arrows about 6:15 p.m. Regional prosecutor Ann Iren Svane Mathiassen, told The Associated Press that after his arrest, the attacker “clearly described what he had done. He admitted killing the five people.”

She said the bow and arrows were just part of his arsenal. Police have not said what else he used, hey dude but Voldseth told the AP that when he ran toward the sound of screams, he saw a woman being stabbed by a man with some kind of weapon.

Voldseth said he recognized the attacker, saying he lived nearby and “usually walks with his head down and headphones on.”

“I have only spoken to him a few times, but I have had the impression he might be a person with problems,” he said.

Mass killings are rare in low-crime Norway, and the attack recalled the country’s worst peacetime slaughter a decade ago, when a right-wing domestic extremist killed 77 people with a bomb, a rifle and a pistol. Memorials were held in July on the 10th anniversary of those slayings.

People have “experienced that their safe local environment suddenly became a dangerous place,” King Harald V said. “It shakes us all when horrible things happen near us, when you least expect it, in the middle of everyday life on the open street.”

New Prime Minister Jonas Gahr Stoere called the attack “horrific.”

Dozens of people saw the killings. Erik Benum, who lives on the same road as the supermarket that was attacked, told AP he saw shop workers taking shelter in doorways.

“I saw them hiding in the corner. Then I went to see what was happening, and I saw the police moving in with a shield and rifles. It was a very strange sight,” Benum said.

Police, along with reinforcements from elsewhere, flooded into Kongsberg and blocked several roads. The blue lights of emergency vehicles and spotlights from a helicopter illuminated the scene.

On Thursday morning, the whole town was eerily quiet, Benum said.

“People are sad and shocked,” he said.

Flags were lowered to half-staff, and residents placed flowers, candles and stuffed animals around a makeshift memorial in a central square.

Mayor Kari Anne Sand described the last 24 hours as a “nightmare.”

“The town was attacked dr martens boots last night and five people died. I think most of the inhabitants are in quite a shock that such a thing could happen here. This is a quiet town, a quiet municipality,” she said, adding that health and social services officials are working to care for those who need assistance.

The main church in Kongsberg also was open for those needing comfort.

“I don’t think anyone expects to have these kinds of experiences. But nobody could imagine this could happen here in our little town,” the Rev. Reidar Aasboe told the AP.

Woody Harrelson punched drunk man who took his picture, police say

Woody Harrelson was involved in a physical altercation in Washington, D.C., but investigators believe he was acting in “self-defense.”

Metropolitan Police spokesman Dustin Sternbeck dr martens boots confirms to Yahoo Entertainment authorities responded to a “reported assault” on Wednesday night at the rooftop bar of the Watergate Hotel. The incident occurred shortly after 11 p.m. when a man, whom cops say was “intoxicated,” started taking photos of Harrelson and his daughter.

Actor Woody Harrelson involved in altercation at Washington, D.C. bar.
Actor Woody Harrelson involved in altercation at Washington, D.C. bar. 

The True Detective star went over and asked the individual to delete the pictures when “a dispute ensued.” The drunk man “lunged” at Harrelson who then hit the individual. There were multiple witnesses who backed up Harrelson’s story and the award-winning actor is not under investigation. Charges are pending on the aggressor, Sternbeck notes. The investigation remains ongoing.

Yahoo Entertainment reached out to hey dude Harrelson’s rep but did not immediately receive a response.

Harrelson is in town shooting the HBO series The White House Plumbers, which is about the Watergate scandal.

Body of climber from Colorado recovered from Bolivian peak

Man shot 6 times waits more than a week for surgery after hospital is overwhelmed by covid

A walkway leading to medical tents outside the Lyndon B. Johnson Hospital in Houston on Aug. 10.

Joel Valdez isn’t in the hospital for covid-19, but he’s feeling its effect.

For 10 days, Valdez has been in a hospital bed at Ben Taub Hospital in Houston awaiting surgery after he was shot six times outside a grocery store as an unlucky bystander to a domestic dispute.

“Having broken balenciaga shoes bones and bullets in me for over a week now, it’s a little frustrating,” Valdez told KRIV over the weekend.

He tallied his injuries, which include a neck wound and three gunshot wounds to a left shoulder that’s in need of surgery: “Everybody is really surprised I’m still in this bed a week later.”

Valdez confirmed Monday afternoon he was still awaiting surgery when contacted by The Washington Post, but declined to be interviewed on the record.

At Ben Taub Hospital where Valdez is awaiting surgery, the intensive care unit was at 103% capacity as of Monday morning, with 33% of those cases related to covid-19, a spokesperson for Harris Health System told The Post. Lyndon B. Johnson Hospital, the other public hospital in the Harris Health System, remains similarly stretched at 94% ICU capacity, with 54% of those cases covid-related.

Amanda Callaway, a spokesperson for the health system, said via email that in response to the influx of coronavirus cases, Harris Health System doctors must triage a patient’s condition and review the surgical cases throughout the day.

“Due to strained resources, surgical patients are being prioritized based on several factors, which unfortunately may result in a delay of nonemergent surgical procedures,” Callaway said.

The troubling fourth wave of the pandemic brought on by the highly transmissible delta variant and millions of Americans steve madden shoes who remain unvaccinated is now straining hospital capacity in hard-hit areas such as Houston.

Last week, Arkansas reported its capacity had fallen to just eight ICU beds statewide while health officials in Mississippi warned that surging infections had pushed the state’s hospital system to the brink of “failure.” On Friday, Oregon Gov. Kate Brown (D) activated 1,500 members of the National Guard to 20 hospitals around the state to shore up dwindling capacity. Officials in Louisiana warned Monday some hospitals are “days away” from being so overwhelmed, ambulances won’t be able to transport patients.

The number of new daily covid-19 hospital admissions and ICU admissions in Texas are both nearing peak levels not seen since December, according to data tracked by The Post. The seven-day average of new daily hospitalizations in the state was 11,993 as of Monday; the total was 8,632 when Valdez was shot Aug. 6.

Valdez had just finished shopping for groceries for his catering business earlier this month when he noticed a couple fighting in the parking lot. A man involved in the argument noticed Valdez and began to yell at him, he told KTRK.

“I got in my car and I was leaving and he gets in his and pulls up next to me, near the entrance of the store,” and fired multiple rounds, Valdez told the news station. “As soon as I got shot and I was driving away, the only thing I could think of when I saw the blood pouring everywhere was my son and my wife.”

In Valdez’s case, ecco shoes the criminal justice system has moved faster than the medical system: Within days of the incident, the man suspected of shooting Valdez was arrested.

Valdez, who has been identified as a new business owner and father to a 3-month-old child, shared with KRIV a message he wanted to give to people learning of his now 10-day wait for surgical attention: “Do your best to maintain your health and not end up in a situation that puts you in the hospital right now.”

St. Louis man wants his guns back after governor’s pardon

FILE – In this June 28, 2020 file photo, armed homeowners Mark and Patricia McCloskey, standing in front their house confront protesters marching to St. Louis Mayor Lyda Krewson’s house in the Central West End of St. Louis. The St. Louis lawyer who was pardoned along with his wife for waving guns at social justice demonstrators is suing to get the guns back. Mark McCloskey, a Republican candidate of U.S. Senate, is also seeking to have fines he paid repaid. In a lawsuit filed Wednesday, Aug. 4, 2021, in St. Louis City Circuit Court, McCloskey said the government should return a rifle and gun that were taken after he pleaded guilty to ecco shoes misdemeanor assault.

ST. LOUIS (AP) — The St. Louis man who along with his wife was pardoned after waving guns at social justice demonstrators has filed a lawsuit to have the guns returned and to have fines the couple paid returned to them.

Mark McCloskey, a Republican candidate for the U.S. Senate, argued in a lawsuit filed Wednesday in St. Louis City Circuit Court that the pardon he and his wife, Patricia, received from Gov. Mike Parson nullifies all judgments and orders in the case, The Kansas City Star reported.

The government seized the McCloskeys’ Colt AR-15 rifle and Bryco pistol after he pleaded guilty in June to misdemeanor assault and was fined $750. His wife pleaded guilty to second-degree misdemeanor harassment and was fined $2,000.

Parson announced Tuesday that he had pardoned the McCloskeys, as he had promised to do after they were charged.

In his petition, McCloskey, who is a lawyer, said the pardon absolved him of “all wrongdoing.”

“The politically-motivated charges that were used to seize our guns were dropped and now the Governor has granted both Patty and me pardons,” Mark McCloskey said in a statement. “I filed a lawsuit today to demand that the Circuit Attorney return our guns immediately.”

The McCloskeys, both lawyers in their 60s, said they felt hey dude shoes threatened by the demonstrators who were passing their home in June 2020 while walking to the nearby home of the mayor to protest George Floyd’s death in Minneapolis. The couple also said the group was trespassing on a private street.

The confrontation drew national attention to the couple, who were praised by conservatives and then-President Donald Trump.

No shots were fired and no one was hurt, and special prosecutor Richard Callahan later determined the protesters were peaceful.